Climate

Term desciption here.

Climate change continued its relentless march in 2020, which is on track to be one of the three warmest years on record. 2011-2020 will be the warmest decade on record, with the warmest six years all being since 2015, according to the World Meteorological Organization.

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It is with deep regret that IOC has to report the passing away of Arthur (Art) Alexiou on 16 June 2020.

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The term “blue carbon” refers to the carbon stored in coastal and marine ecosystems. The so-called blue carbon ecosystems – mangroves, tidal and salt marshes, and seagrasses – are highly productive coastal ecosystems that are particularly important for their capacity to store carbon within the plants and in the sediments below. Scientific assessments show that they can sequester two to four times more carbon than terrestrial forests and are thereby considered a key component of nature-based solutions to climate change.

Published as: Our Work

New York / Geneva, 10 March 2020 - The tell-tale physical signs of climate change such as increasing land and ocean heat, accelerating sea level rise and melting ice are highlighted in a new report compiled by the World Meteorological Organization and an extensive network of partners.

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GOOS Observations Coordination Group launches a new Ocean Observing System Report Card and introduces the rebranding of OceanOPS (previously JCOMMOPS) along with its first-ever 5-year Strategic Plan (2021-2025), phased with the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (“Ocean Decade”).

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Less than twenty per cent of the world’s oceans have been explored so far. That is not a lot. But it is enough for us to know that the oceans are threatened by global warming, acidification, and pollution. Coral bleaching is just one illustration of the decline of marine ecosystems. The consequences are not just environmental. Nearly three billion people depend directly on marine and coastal biodiversity for their survival. By 2050, coastal areas that are home to300 million people could be threatened by rising sea levels due to climate change.

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A Data Rescue Working Group will be established under the auspices of UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and its network Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS) to strengthen international cooperation in rescue of historical sea level data.

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The Observations Coordination Group of the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) launches the new Ocean Observing System Report Card for 2021 - providing an up-to-date and global view of the status of the Global Ocean Observing System.

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It is with great sadness that the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO acknowledges the passing away of Professor Doctor Biliana Cicin-Sain on 1 September 2020.

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Climate change has not stopped for COVID-19. Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere are at record levels and continue to increase. Emissions are heading in the direction of pre-pandemic levels following a temporary decline caused by the lockdown and economic slowdown. The world is set to see its warmest five years on record – in a trend which is likely to continue - and is not on track to meet agreed targets to keep global temperature increase well below 2 °C or at 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels.

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